Are You Ready for the New NIH Payment Management System?

imagesNot the NIH, Not Again. (Sigh.)

You’ll have to forgive me, I know there is more to research administration than the NIH. (DOD, anyone? NSF?) It’s not that I choose to ignore the rest of the agencies out there funding the Federal share of academic research….really. It’s just that the NIH is in many ways, the canary in the coal mine for new policy at the Federal level. So I figure it’s going to be helpful to more than those of us working in the biomedical research area to talk about some of these issues.

The August Freak Out

In August and September 2013, NIH announced that their grants management systems would transition awardees to a new payment management process in order to allow the agency and their institutes and centers to better track award spending. They provided some preliminary details – enough to make every central office at every university with NIH funding to freak out – how is this going to work? Subsequent communications clarified the process, which have allowed schools to prepare and plan.

changeImplementation in Two Phases

The transition from PMS pooled (G) accounts to PMS (P) sub-accounts will occur over two fiscal years, and it started in October of 2013. There is an excellent FAQ on the transition, which will occur in two phases.

  • Phase 1 – Effective October 2013: Transition of Awards with New Document Number
  • Phase 2 – Effective October 2014: Transition of Continuing Domestic Awards

The notice of grant award will contain additional information to indicate the type of account (G to P) that is being used to award the funds in the transition year. The transition year will require a new award type (Type 4) and administratively shortened segments – for competitive awards in FY14 and FY 15.

Financial reporting requirements will be affected during these changes (there will be additional closing periods) and the reporting requirements for awards will be affected by whether or not the award was made under SNAP (now RPPR). During the transition, it looks like non-competing continuations under SNAP may need to submit two FFRs in FY14.

Importantly – carryover authority is not automatically available during this time frame. Grantees will report unobligated balances and receive approval for these funds to be re-obligated to the new sub-account. NIH states that even if the award was issued with “automatic carryover authority” the grantee has to receive approval through a new NOGA before funds are drawn down.

What You Need to Do Right Now

Review your award portfolio and take steps to ensure awards are appropriately charged for direct costs up front, reducing the need for cost transfers. This saves time, heightens compliance and allows your institution to meet the challenge of shortened reporting time frames.

  1. How many awards are under SNAP? How many are not under SNAP? (This will affect the calculation of your unliquidated obligations and unobligated balances – which, in this new world of payment management should be minimal.)
  2. What are their project dates, and how are they looking financially? (Are all expenses hitting the project in a timely manner?) If not, why not?
  3. What systems are in place to ensure direct charging of appropriate expenses (salary and non-salary) to awards, and reconciling expenses on a monthly basis? If these systems don’t yet exist, what needs to be done to set them up?
  4. Is there a process to regularly meet with investigators to review award activity and plan for changes in allocation of expenses proactively (to prevent cost transfers)?
  5. What reporting and queries can you utilize to easily manage your portfolio and provide updates to your investigators?
  6. Start to develop great relationships with your subcontract sites now – if you haven’t already. You’ll need to have them generate their final invoices faster than they have in the past.

What Your Investigators Need to Know

money-under-mattress-300x217We all know PI’s who think of Federal grants like funds stuffed between a mattress for a rainy day. Yet for every investigator who thinks like that, there are two that understand and have a very keen appreciation for managing awards. However, the new payment management system, combined with the shortened time frame for closing out awards is creating a new environment for managing sponsored funds.  We have to impress upon our most studious investigators that if they do not use their Federal funding, they will lose it.

This is the time when we can help our investigators by providing administrative leadership:

  • Clearly outlining what our investigators need to know about the policy and how we need to work with them to administer their projects.
  • Providing them with financial information regularly so they can make decisions about their research plan and strategy (and we can ensure administrative actions regarding purchasing, effort and salary administration and reimbursements are managed in a timely manner).
  • Updating our investigators regarding policy changes and trends in the availability of carry forward funds, additional reporting requirements, and other trends to assist them in managing their current awards and planning for new applications.

The Department of Defense already has a strong payment management system in place, but it stands to reason that the Department of Health and Human Services, and other federal agencies will look to adopt more stringent monitoring of federal grants. Have you seen the Do Not Pay website? The Obama administration, in creating a government that utilizes data and analytics to generate accountability, is creating a network of systems to ensure that funds are distributed, tracked and paid to the proper recipients.

One Part Challenge, Two Parts Opportunity

To be sure, the next 18 months aren’t going to be easy – but working together we’ll transition to the new payment management system. More importantly – it’s an opportunity to introduce new ways of managing sponsored projects that can remain in place to meet the challenges of tighter Federal funding in the future.

Happy New Year! A81 Is Here!

It’s 2014! Our holiday wishes came true – at least some of them, any way. No shutdown in Washington D.C. – check. At the same time, Congress decided to roll back part of the sequestration cuts and restore funding to many areas of the Federal Government affected by last years deep spending cuts – check. And the Office of Management and Budget – gave us that mega-circular they had been promising for 2 years – CHECK!

That’s a Mouthful!

The new mega-circular, known as Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards, Final Rule, aims to tame the avalanche of  overlapping or contradictory guidance that was previously in effect with the eight separate circulars published by the OMB over a series of many years. These circulars, (including A-133, A-21, and A-110) applied toinformation overload hospitals, institutions of higher education, non-profit institutions, cities, states, tribal organizations, and other types of organizations, and over the years, interpreting the guidance in these documents became more difficult. A working group came together to combine the circulars into one document that would apply to all non-Federal agencies and aim to simplify the process of managing grants and contracts. These organizations worked with COFAR (the Council on Financial Assistance Reform) and the administration to develop new guidance that reflected the current reality of managing Federal awards.

The new guidance was published on December 26, 2013 in the Federal Register, and it’s over 100 pages long. It is well organized, easy to read and search online, and has a lot of familiar information for research administrators. However, in revising and updating the guidance for managing grants and contracts, the Federal government took the opportunity to incorporate input from organizations and change policies and processes regarding grants management.

What You Should Know

Key aspects of the new guidance include the following:

  • Performance over Compliance for Accountability

The emphasis in the new guidance is definitely on generating results and outcomes that can be shared with other award recipients. The Federal government is not going to allow non-compliance, but they do not want overly burdensome rules to prevent an investigator or a collaborating team from accomplishing a stack-of-paperstheir research aims. As you read the guidance, you’ll see that this is the goal.

  • Family-Friendly Policies Encouraged

The guidance definitely encourages organizations that receive Federal funding to develop (if they do not already have) family-friendly policies. They have updated their policies to include family-friendly issues such as costs related to the identification of day-care providers, and the need to allow parents to document  time out of the workforce on their biosketches.

  • Increasing de minimis Threshold for Indirect Costs to 10%

The new guidance allows organizations that cannot afford to negotiate an indirect rate to budget a 10% de minimis indirect rate with the Federal government. Previously the rate was 8%.

  • Administrative Costs can be Charged as Direct Costs

The guidance also provides specific information, in many ways, for the first time, about how to manage administrative costs as a direct cost. This issue can be difficult because it is often charged as an indirect cost (an in most cases it should be charged that way). This guidance correctly acknowledges the need for charging administrative costs as a direct cost and how to manage this situation.

  • Payment Management System Clues 

The circular provides more information than before on ensuring consistency in allocating costs, and when to secure written approval for assigning a cost to an award. The cost principles  and audit sections of the document are very useful, and it states that there is now a limit of three years for the Federal government to review awards in order to disallow costs. This, combined with the new 90 day rule for reporting on awards at the end of the project period gives us an indicator of how the Federal government will be managing award dollars in the future. Can you say “use it or lose it?”

  • Focus on Delivering Results and Outcomes

There is an entire section in the document that discusses how RFAs  and PAs will be written and what must be included in them. The circular states that RFAs and PAs have to be available 60 days before the opportunity closes – which is an interesting development. It will be fascinating to see if the language on “outcomes” and “milestones” translates into a new format for the funding announcements. Stay tuned.

To see a webcast about the new guidance click here.

Here’s to a great start to 2014 – may your New Year be productive and fulfilling!

The Fallout from October Has Just Begun: Here’s What You Need to Know

United States Capitol BuildingSHUTDOWN FALLOUT

Congress has opened its doors for business again after a two-week political roller coaster ride. The impact of this legislative hissy fit, however is still being assessed. While the media has focused on the patients in Washington DC that weren’t registered for trials at the NIH (truly a heartache) and the researchers in Antarctica and other extreme climes, research administrators have feverishly worked to meet a crushing load of November application deadlines.

In addition, research administrators and faculty have worked to assess the impact of missed application reviews on previous submissions from the last cycle, and how this will impact the upcoming review schedules. Meetings for 200 review committees scheduled for October at the NIH were canceled during the shutdown, and the impact of rescheduling these meetings (and therefore bumping the schedule of awarding these grants and holding future reviews for the upcoming cycle) is breathtakingly frightening for academic institutions across the country. Fortunately reviewers stepped forward and have volunteered to make time to participate (as institutions like the NIH originally announced revised schedules several months out, causing widespread alarm). NIH reviews are resuming in January instead of May.

NEW PAYMENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM AT NIH

As if the shutdown didn’t give us enough excitement to manage, we are looking to the new NIH payment images (1)management system which is going into effect as we speak. The new payment management system is a process that accomplishes 2 things. First, it allows the NIH to transition current domestic awards from PMS pooled accounts (type G) to a new type of account called a PMS type G subaccount. Second, it will allow the NIH to award all new grants and contracts as the PMS type G subaccount and allow the agency to administer all awards with new payment management rules.

Starting in November, notices of award will list the type of award (type P or G). To facilitate the transfer process, the NIH will transfer new awards into the new PMS system in FY14 (which has already started. In FY15, the NIH will transfer continuing awards.

hound dogSome changes to the management of awards and closeouts have already taken place, and if you don’t know about them, you should:

1. Depending on your institution’s standard operating procedures, the NIH policy previously afforded additional time for reconciling and closing out the award before completing the annual or final financial report. The new policy requires that awards be ready for closeout at the end of the award period for a prompt production of the annual or final financial report. If your expenses have not hit the proper account when they were supposed to, you will not have enough time to fix it at the end of the budget period or award period.

2. As awards shift from the old to the new payment system, competitive segments will be shortened for one year and new awards will be given new identifiers on the NOA. Get ready for some fancy footwork – tracking and reporting on these awards will be F-U-N.

3. Prepare to bid goodbye to unliquidated obligations from previous award segments/periods. Either encumber funds, and use them, or plan to lose them at the end of the budget period. PERIOD. The new FFR format calls out the unexpended balance from prior project period right up front. (They might as well call it “funds to cut from this project budget”).

4. Automatic carry forward can be requested – but funds are not permitted to be drawn down until they are formally approved and appear on the new NOA. (Read between the lines: carry forward isn’t so automatic anymore.)

These new requirements require a laser focus on direct charging salary to sponsored projects, and encumbering salary and project expenses appropriately to awards. Research administrators need to reconcile projects on a monthly basis to ensure that charges are hitting correctly to have the grants and contracts awarded to their investigators managed to a successful close.

AN END TO SEQUESTRATION?

Congress is talking now about how they will come together in January to pass a budget – and believe it or not, they are talking about adjusting the terms of the sequester. It’s hard to believe that sequestration is back on the table (for more information about sequestration, check out my previous post). Everyone seems to agree that the across-the-board cuts have been a disaster, but, as you can guess, nobody in Congress agrees on a way to restore cuts in a fashion that can be voted on to pass in both the House and the Senate. (Does this sound familiar?) While it would be fantastic to have improvements in sequestration funding, and there appears to be bi-partisan support for doing so, this seems to be linked to passing a budget in January, and if that is the case, I’d put money on the likelihood of another government shutdown.

The DOD would be a likely target for increased funding (relief of sequestration) but its hard to tell how the NSF, NIH, FDA or other agencies would fare given the history of divisiveness that exists.

WHAT YOU CAN DO

  1. Assess your investigators’ research portfolios now; analyze your investigators’ salary and effort plans using the proposed data and effort certified to project out their current commitments if you haven’t already done this.
  2. Analyze the salary and effort of staff in the laboratories or on the projects that your investigators support.
  3. Assess the status of your investigators’ applications, if possible, to know where they are in the pipeline. Create a projection based on likelihood of funding, planned applications and current funding.
  4. Work with faculty and staff to assess potential gaps in funding for your faculty and staff. Begin to plan and request appropriate resources to cover faculty and staff salary and research during any time when the faculty member is not covered by sponsored funding.
  5. Create a budget and plan to support the request, and work with the faculty member and his/her department to request support.
  6. Assess institutional resources available to submit new applications early – should it be that we face additional gridlock in DC. Plan with your investigators to do this, if possible. (Adios, December!)
  7. Keep an eye on DC politics – and hope that this time around it’s not as bad. (Check out these resources from my previous post.)

By using our unique resources and perspective, we can help our institutions support the faculty and staff that are performing research in a wide variety of fields that make our world a better place to live. This is a really tough time, and we need to step up and make it possible for the research community to concentrate on their work – and not on the political struggles in Washington.

Preparation Nation: Shut Down Week 3 – What Happens Now?

Fiscal Cliff 2I’m following the latest on the back and forth negotiations in Washington DC on my iPad like a devotee of Scandal (or Breaking Bad for you guys out there). Will they or won’t they? Who is doing what to whom? When will they open the government? Are we going over the cliff? Oh the drama!

It would be entertaining – if it weren’t so high stakes for the scientists doing research around the world. And not just for the graduate student who traveled all the way from Boston to Antarctica and had to travel all the way home again once he got there (because his research project was cancelled during his trip). Scientists are reporting that the shutdown is having a devastating impact on the ability to obtain specimens, recruit participants, and collect and analyze data – which could set back research in a variety of fields from months to years. You can tap in to conversations that researchers are having online on Reddit here. (Note the team that is working at the South Pole!) You can also follow #shutscience on twitter for more stories from scientists who are on experiencing the shutdown’s devastating impact on their work.

The Status of Negotiations

While it appears that Congress and the President are making some headway towards an agreement that will keep us away from the fiscal cliff (and perhaps negotiating a budget to open the government in the meantime) they will need to achieve that in the next three days. If memory serves, this Congress likes to take us to the last second, we’ll see. If you’d like to track the status of discussions in Washington, a few helpful resources include a visual guide to the negotiations; a series of articles on the shutdown and its impact on science, and to remind us what we’ve lost in all of this, a tally of what the shutdown has cost.

The Washington Post has a live update on the negotiations on their website if you can stomach the roller coaster ride.

Resources To Keep Going During The Shutdown

You may have already figured out some quick fixes when the NSF, NIH and other government websites went dark. Google cache is one easy way to find program announcements, RFAs and access to other website pages that are currently unavailable. There are other homegrown websites and links (see resources above) with additional links and documents. While Federal government agencies have stopped accepting applications (you can submit to grants.gov, but they won’t reach the agency, so most agencies have said not to submit)  preparations for completing grant submissions should continue on schedule.

However, we are learning from NCI Director Howard Varmus just how long it may take for most Federal agencies to come back on-line after the shut down is over.

When the Shutdown is Over

By law, Federal employees had to vacate the premises and leave behind their work computers and devices on the last day of the fiscal year. The shut down was completed within 1/2 day (in reality, I’m sure most agencies saw it coming and were prepared for some time).

Since then, we’ve not heard much, until now, about how the shutdown is affecting agencies and their ability to fund and manage research and how things might work after the shutdown is over. This memo from Harold Varmus gives us a leg up on how we can get ready for questions from our investigators – and as you’d suspect, the news isn’t great. Large and small agencies are going to have a tough time catching up from just a couple of weeks – and as we know, these weeks contained crucial grant and contract deadlines.

We’ll be ready to submit applications, but the systems to accept them will have to be ready for every application, all at once. Grant review meetings will need to be rescheduled as quickly as possible – and all of the missed deadlines and missed meetings will have a cascading effect on upcoming deadlines for every type of extramural application. All of these activities depend on hundreds, if not thousands of faculty and staff altering their plans to participate in rescheduled reviews to bring the process back on-line.

And the longer we’re waiting, the worse the problem becomes.

What Can You Do to Help Your Investigators?

As most program officers are unavailable (they have been furloughed) it’s important to keep up with the latest news in Washington to identify potential impact on your investigator’s research.

  1. Talk to your investigator regularly to determine his/her concerns – a lot of investigators have concerns that are time-dependent. (If the shutdown lasts until X date, I’ll be fine, but if it goes until Y date, this will happen…)
  2. Read academic media to learn what your investigator’s colleagues are doing to cope in the face of the shutdown.
  3. Discuss fiscal strategies for managing research projects given a delayed payment cycle – if you have projects that are in the process of being renewed, how will your investigator manage with his/her current budget?
  4. Investigate available institutional resources, if you’re that fortunate, for these types of situations. Perhaps you can pool institutional resources to care for animals, or share staffing to keep gathering data, etc.
  5. Talk to central offices about what they are hearing regarding the shutdown, and how you can prepare for next steps.
  6. If you find something that was especially effective to assist your investigator in weathering the storm, remember what you did, because you’ll need to do it again in six months!

Remember – expect the worst – and hope for the best, and maybe we’ll end up somewhere in between.

Justification Nation – Part 2: Supporting Research Personnel: Budgeting Salary and Fringe on Research Grants

scientists working at the laboratoryBudgeting Salaries and Fringe for Faculty and Staff

Sounds deceptively simple, doesn’t it? On most research proposals, personnel costs range from 60-70%. Budgeting and justifying personnel is extremely important and in principle, comes down to a few key issues:

Are the right faculty and staff on the proposal? Does the project have the right leadership?

Are the personnel on the proposal performing the right work?

Are the personnel on the proposal performing the right work for a reasonable estimate of time?

Fortunately, the choice of faculty and staff isn’t up to the research administrator. The PI will select his or her collaborators to achieve the scientific aims and enhance his or her chances of getting funded. But let’s face it. It’s a good thing we’re working on the budget – because there isn’t a PI on the planet that really understands how people are paid (or what they really make). Double and triple checking this information is key to submitting an accurate budget that covers the University’s actual personnel costs. If the proposal is awarded, the salary had better be calculated correctly, proposed with the proper person-months of effort, contain summer salary if the faculty member has a nine-month appointment, and justify the VA commitment if it exists.  Not so simple after all.

Budgeting Salary and Effort on Sponsored Projects

It’s important to start with the FOA – and any requirements from the sponsor. Is there a required amount of effort from the PI, or any others on the proposal? For grantsmanship, you’ll find that for most federal proposals, the PI will have to give at least 15-25%. (1.80 to 3.0 person months)

Who else is essential for the project? What levels of effort will they be working? Note that most PI’s think in levels of effort – you can convert to person months when you are done tweaking the budget. Outline each role for each person on the application. What will they be doing for the level of effort the PI has given them? Discuss with the PI that  20% time is one day a week, 10% time is 1/2 day a week, for that level of effort, how will the PI justify that much time on a sponsored project? Push for detail.

Draft the budget justification based on this information – and then look at the numbers and see where you end up – and edit from there. That’s how the process works. There are a couple of important things to be aware of as you write the document, which I’ll outline below.

General Budget Justification Format for Personnel with Salary and Fringe

Henry Smith, Ph.D., P.I. (1.8 calendar months), will serve as PI and Project Director on this project.  Professor of Pathology at Superb University and an HHMI investigator, he has researched nanostructures extensively, and has over 25 years of highly regarded work in the field.  He will have overall responsibility for all aspects of the project, supervise lab personnel working on experiments and will be responsible for organizing and chairing meetings of the advisory committee. In addition, he will be serving as the lead investigator of the microbiology core.

Looking for ways to justify a person or item on your justification? Google it! Someone else has faced the same problem, I guarantee it.

Justifying Faculty and Staff Fringe Rates

Your institution’s F&A agreement also contains the approved fringe rates for all employees. Be sure to use the correct fringe rates for each type of faculty and staff member, depending on their appointment. Most universities require a standard template to be used in the justification.

Remember to Inflate Salaries, Blend Fringe and Use the Cap only When Needed

In these economic times, institutions are ensuring that every salary dollar is proposed on the application – that means using the formula that factors in a salary increase each year, blends the fringe rate across each project year and only uses the salary cap on projects where it is required. Ensure that you include your inflation factors in your budget justification.

TipsA research administrator who is beginning the budgeting process should be prepared for several common questions that may arise, depending on the level of experience that the PI and project staff have with project planning and budgeting. Awareness of these potential concerns can prevent misunderstandings and assist in decision making.

1. Limit the distribution of salary information. Plan to limit distribution of salary information to as few people as possible during the budgeting process, especially during the budgeting of salary on the project. Faculty and staff may not know one another’s salary information if they have not budgeted many grants together. If salary information has to be distributed, hiding the base salary column may be recommended, you can check.

2. Beware of language in your justification that commits cost sharing. If your PI or any personnel for that matter are “contributing services” you need to write about their work in a way that does not specify exactly what they will do or how much time they will give. That’s voluntary committed cost sharing, and it happens all the time. Beware!

3. Understand the basis of a faculty or staff member’s appointment before moving forward with budgeting them on the proposal. Alert the PI if there is a problem with how the PI is proposing them on the application. The faculty or staff member must have an appointment that is consistent with how they are proposed on the application; they should have salary at the institution (versus an affiliate), or be eligible to receive a stipend versus salary and fringe. If there is some discrepancy, it can be corrected at the time of the application, instead of trying to fix a problem downstream at the time of the award (when the budget won’t allow for an increase).

4. Keep in mind that in most cases, stipends are for students or trainees receiving an education benefit from participating in the grant. Investigators are occasionally inclined to propose paying stipends for employees – instead of trainees. Consult your HR guidelines, and the FOA for more information.

5. Similarly, even seasoned investigators propose hiring colleagues on a proposal as a consultant. There are specific rules as to the type of personnel who can fulfill a consultant role. In a majority of cases, the role is fulfilled by an individual from outside the institution who is using their own resources and providing a specific expertise that is essential to the project. This individual does not contribute to the direction of the scientific work of the study.

These are general guidelines for budgeting salary and fringe on sponsored projects – it’s impossible to be specific for each type of application. For specific questions about types of applications there are excellent websites for federal agencies – and you can reach out to experienced research administrators for help.

NEXT: MORE ABOUT BUDGETING FACULTY AND STAFF, AND BUDGETING TRAINEES

Still wondering why it’s so hard to charge meeting expenses to a grant?

images (1)

What Happens In Vegas…

Ever pay $7 for a piece of sushi? The federal government did in 2010, at a conference for 300 General Service Administration workers. It also footed the bill for $44 breakfasts, $95 dinners, lavish receptions, gifts for conference attendees, and other services, to the tune of $823,000 for a four-day training conference. That’s a whopping $2,743 per employee. (My head is spinning as I write this.)  Did I mention the conference was held in Las Vegas? When the auditors found out, and issued a report in April of 2012, and a similar scandal followed from the Veterans Affairs Administration, albeit on a slightly smaller budget. ($300,000)

….Didn’t Stay in Vegas

Obama issued two Executive Orders, which specified not only how the federal government was to conduct business with regard to expenditures related to travel, conferences, promotional items, printing, and food purchases for all types of circumstances, but these Executive Orders outlined how agencies were to use government funds in all areas – both intramural and extramural – to follow these orders. This included how recipients of awards were to follow these orders. NPR Marketplace Article, April 2012

Just to bring you up to speed, these guidelines included informing government agencies to print on both sides of the page, use .5″ margins when printing, and use the draft setting on the printer to maximize paper use, and to use electronic versions of documents whenever possible. Regarding travel – if a federal employee can accomplish the work without traveling to do it, the EO and guidelines state that this is the preferred method. Food is offered or accepted by federal employees only when it is included as part of the cost of an event and part of the business conducted at a meeting.  There are exceptional circumstances, but they are few and far between.

So What Do I Tell My PI?

So in general, its best to minimize expenses on food, printing and travel on sponsored projects given the environment we are in, but that doesn’t mean we can’t offer food to conference participants. (I recently had a PI tell me that I wanted her conference attendees to wither from hunger after a day-long conference without any food after informing her of these rules…) There ARE a lot of changes to meeting expenses on grants, and they affect every government agency that funds research. The HHS documentation is the easiest to refer to, so I’m including it here.

You have to plan ahead if you are going to have a conference or meeting where you are going to host attendees, and you plan to offer them materials, and any type of food or drink. This is clearly the case where preparation in the pre-award (application) phase will help with the execution of a meeting or conference in the post-award phase of a project.

MEALS: Business needs to be conducted when food or drink is served. Accordingly, it is not possible to have breakfast, lunch, or breaks between meeting times. The formal meeting needs to continue in order for these costs to be covered. This means that:

  1. The meeting needs to start when you serve a continental breakfast. Participants need to eat while the meeting is going on.
  2. Lunch needs to have a keynote speaker.
  3. Formal coffee breaks are no more. Participants can get up and help themselves to coffee and use the bathroom as the meetings progress. If you take a break, don’t serve food.
  4. You cannot charge the cost of meals/beverages to a grant for federal employees. This means that every conference or meeting you hold that are funded with federal dollars needs to have a sign in sheet, and there needs to be a check box to ask if an attendee is a federal employee.
  5. Your agenda should reflect the activity of the meeting and when meals are served accordingly to demonstrate to your project officer that these rules were followed.
  6. Use per diem rates set by your University.

MATERIALS: Using a website to have participants download meeting materials (instead of printing them out) is a viable alternative to keeping handouts and materials costs to a minimum. If you want to fund a giveaway item –  make it a memory stick with the materials on it.

SPACE: Free or reduced cost meeting space should be used whenever possible.

TRAVEL: Piggy-back meetings for studies on top of regular annual meetings your PI will normally attend. Chances are, his or her collaborators will be there too. Use Skype, free conference calling, and other electronic resources. Your project officer should see why travel is necessary for the meeting to take place.

If you currently have an award with a proposed budget for a conference, it doesn’t mean that you can spend the line items as is – President Obama’s Executive Orders take precedence.

THE BOTTOM LINE

Think through the meetings and conferences on your research budgets carefully, and prepare program staff for the extra documentation needed for these activities. It’s crucial!

Why research administrators need to care about the fiscal cliff – now, and after the New Year

It’s time to wake up and smell the coffee. 

If you think the fiscal cliff negotiations have to do with raising taxes on the middle class, and not much else, you’d be wrong.

If you haven’t been following the budget negotiations in Washington, DC, and aren’t sure what the threat of “sequestration” means, here’s a brief “Fiscal-Cliff Notes” review to catch you up on the conversation:

Last November, a Joint Select Committee of Congress on Deficit Reduction couldn’t reach an agreement on how to achieve a $1.2 trillion dollar deficit reduction package for 2013-2021 to introduce to Congress. As a result, the Budget Control Act of 2011 specifies that $1.2 trillion in spending cuts or reduced budget authority would go into effect, starting in 2013, across the board, affecting defense and non-defense programs each year.  The process that enacts the spending cuts is called sequestration.

What will sequestration do to research funding?

The sequestration package, as it is currently written, would reduce funding to research agencies by 8% – which, for the NIH is $2.5 billion dollars, or the ability to make 2,100 new and competing awards. That’s just one agency for one year.

Now apply sequestration to the agency your investigator works with, and do the math.

As one private citizen to another, I’m suggesting that you e-mail your Congressperson today. While you’re at it, let the President, and the Speaker of the House know how you feel about the prospect of our nation falling off the fiscal cliff. Talk personally about your experience. (Word of advice, you are a private citizen when you contact your member of Congress, not a representative of your University. Given that your University is a non-profit of some type, this distinction is important.)

It’s likely that a patchwork deal will be put in place to avert disaster, and the negotiations will continue on after the holidays. Write today – your voice makes a difference for you and everyone counting on the  research we help support.

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